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Memphis-Style Ribs

242248

yield: Makes 6 servings

Editor’s note: The recipe and introductory text below are from The Barbecue! Bible 10th Anniversary Edition, by Steven Raichlen. To read more about Raichlen and barbecue, go to our feature The Best Barbecue in the U.S.A.

It never fails to amaze me how one simple idea can give birth to so many great regional variations. Consider ribs. The pork rib is one of the most perfect morsels ever to occupy a grill. The meat is generously marbled, which keeps it moist during prolonged cooking. As the fat melts, it crisps the meat fibers and bastes the meat naturally. The bones impart a rich meaty flavor (meat next to the bone always tastes best), while literally providing a physical support—a gnawable rack on which to cook the meat. Yet depending on whether you eat ribs in Birmingham or Kansas City, or Bangkok or Paris for that matter, you’ll get a completely different preparation.

I’ve always been partial to Memphis-style ribs. Memphians don’t mess around with a lot of sugary sauces. Instead, they favor dry rubs—full-flavored mixtures of paprika, black pepper, and cayenne, with just a touch of brown sugar for sweetness. The rub is massaged into the meat the night before grilling, and additional rub is sprinkled on the ribs at the end of cooking. This double application of spices creates incredible character and depth of flavor, while at the same time preserving the natural taste of the pork. Sometimes a vinegar and mustard based sauce—aptly called a mop sauce—is swabbed over the ribs (with said mop) during cooking; I’ve included one here, for you to use if you like.

You can choose any type of rib for this recipe: baby back ribs, long ends, short ends, rib tips—you name it. Cooking times are approximate. The ribs are done when the ends of the bones protrude and the meat is tender enough to pull apart with your fingers. I like my ribs served dry, in the style of Memphis’s legendary barbecue haunt, the Rendezvous. If you want to serve them with a sauce, you’ll find a number to choose from in this chapter.

 

Grilling Method

  • Indirect grilling

Advance preparation

  • 4 to 8 hours for marinating the ribs

Special equipment

  • 1 1/2 cups wood chips or chunks (preferably hickory), soaked for 1 hour in cold water to cover and drained

For the ribs and rub

  • 3 racks baby back pork ribs (about 7 pounds), or 2 racks pork spareribs (6 to 8 pounds total)
  • 1/4 cup sweet paprika
  • 4 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 1/2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons celery salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dry mustard
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin

For the mop sauce (optional)

  • 1. Prepare the ribs and rub: Remove the thin, papery skin from the back of each rack of ribs by pulling it off in a sheet with your fingers, using the corner of a kitchen towel to gain a secure grip, or with pliers.

    2. Combine the paprika, black pepper, brown sugar, salt, celery salt, cayenne, garlic powder, dry mustard, and cumin in a small bowl and whisk to mix. Rub two thirds of this mixture over the ribs on both sides, then transfer the ribs to a roasting pan. Cover and let cure, in the refrigerator, for 4 to 8 hours.

    3. Prepare the mop sauce (if using): Mix together the cider vinegar, mustard, and salt in a bowl and set aside.

    4. Set up the grill for indirect grilling and place a large drip pan in the center.

    If using a gas grill, place all of the wood chips in the smoker box and preheat the grill to high; when smoke appears, reduce the heat to medium.

    If using a charcoal grill, preheat it to medium.

    5. When ready to cook, if using a charcoal grill, toss the wood chips on the coals. Brush and oil the grill grate. Arrange the ribs on the hot grate over the drip pan. Cover the grill and smoke cook the ribs for 1 hour.

    6. When the ribs have cooked for an hour, uncover the grill and brush the ribs with the mop sauce (if using). Re-cover the grill and continue cooking the ribs until tender and almost done, 1/4 to 1/2 hour longer for baby back ribs, 1/2 to 1 hour longer for spareribs. The ribs are done when the meat is very tender and has shrunk back from the ends of the bones. If using a charcoal grill, you’ll need to add 10 to 12 fresh coals to each side after 1 hour. Fifteen minutes before the ribs are done, season them with the remaining rub, sprinkling it on.

    7. To serve, cut the racks in half or, for a plate-burying effect, just leave them whole.

 

353782

Bon Appétit  | July 2009

by Steven Raichlen

yield: Makes 6 servings

Colombia may be the best kept barbecue secret in South America. Sure, Argentina gets the attention for its cowboy-style asado. And Brazil has enjoyed spectacular success exporting its rodizio-style restaurants—the kind where the waiters parade spits of grilled meats through the dining room. But Colombia? I doubt that most North Americans could name a single Colombian grilled dish. Well, it’s time to shine the spotlight on the only country in South America to have coasts on both the Atlantic and the Pacific, whose cool-weather ranching district produces well-marbled, full-flavored beef, whose grill masters make extensive use of marinades (unlike the simplicity prized by their Argentine counterparts), and whose mastery of the art of grilling on charcoal extends to some unique techniques. Here’s a not-so simple flank steak redolent of cumin, green onions, and beer.
 

  • 2 1 1/3-pound flank steaks
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Coarse kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 11/4 cups thinly sliced green onions (about 6)
  • 1 12-ounce bottle dark beer
  • 1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • Aji sauce
  • Colombian Guacamole
  • Using sharp knife, lightly score flank steaks about 1/8 inch deep on both sides in a crisscross pattern at 1/2-inch intervals. Place steaks in 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish. Sprinkle steaks on both sides with oregano and cumin and generous amount of coarse salt and freshly ground pepper. Drizzle olive oil over both sides of steaks, rubbing oil and spices into meat. Add green onions, beer, and Worcestershire sauce, turning steaks several times to coat both sides. Cover and chill at least 3 hours, turning occasionally. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Keep chilled.

    Prepare barbecue (medium-high heat). Brush grill rack lightly with oil. Grill steaks to desired doneness, 3 to 4 minutes total per side for medium-rare, turning steaks 1/4 turn after 1 1/2 minutes to form crisscross grill marks, if desired. Transfer steaks to cutting board; let rest 5 minutes. Thinly slice steaks across grain. Transfer to platter and serve with Aji Sauce and Colombian Guacamole.

    Aji sauce
    Ingredients:
    • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped seeded jalapeño chiles (about 4 large)
    • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped green onions (about 2 large)
    • 1/3 cup coarsely chopped sweet onion (such as Maui or Vidalia)
    • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
    • 2 tablespoons (or more) red wine vinegar or fresh lime juice
    • 3/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    Preparation:

    Combine jalapeño chiles, green onions, sweet onion, and cilantro in processor; puree until paste forms, scraping down sides of bowl with rubber spatula several times. Add 2 tablespoons vinegar and process until mixture is blended but some texture still remains. Transfer to small bowl. Stir in 3/4 teaspoon coarse salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and more vinegar to taste, if desired. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.

    Colombian Guacamole

    Ingredients:

  • 1 large ripe avocado (12 to 13 ounces), peeled, pitted, coarsely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
  • 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped green onion or sweet onion (such as Maui or Vidalia)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped serrano chiles with seeds
  • 1/4 cup (or more) water
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons (or more) fresh lime juice
  • Coarse kosher salt
  • Preparation:

    Combine avocado, cilantro, green onion, and serrano chiles in processor. Puree until smooth. Add 1/4 cup water and 21/2 tablespoons lime juice and process to blend. Add more water to avocado mixture by tablespoonfuls if needed and blend until thick sauce forms.

    Transfer to small bowl; season to taste with coarse salt and pepper and more lime juice, if desired. DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 hours ahead. Cover and chill.

    Bon Appétit  | July 2009

    by Steven Raichlen

    Grilled Salmon

    salmon

    SUBMITTED BY: tinamenina

    Courtesy of Allrecipes.com 

    “A simple soy sauce and brown sugar marinade, with hints of lemon and garlic, are the perfect salty-sweet complement to rich salmon fillets. Even my 9 year old loves this recipe!”
     

    INGREDIENTS

    • 1 1/2 pounds salmon fillets
    • lemon pepper to taste
    • garlic powder to taste
    • salt to taste
    • 1/3 cup soy sauce
    • 1/3 cup brown sugar
    • 1/3 cup water
    • 1/4 cup vegetable oil  

    DIRECTIONS

    1. Season salmon fillets with lemon pepper, garlic powder, and salt.
    2. In a small bowl, stir together soy sauce, brown sugar, water, and vegetable oil until sugar is dissolved. Place fish in a large resealable plastic bag with the soy sauce mixture, seal, and turn to coat. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours.
    3. Preheat grill for medium heat.
    4. Lightly oil grill grate. Place salmon on the preheated grill, and discard marinade. Cook salmon for 6 to 8 minutes per side, or until the fish flakes easily with a fork.

    roasted-pork-tenderloin1

    Bon Appétit | April 1996
    Goodfellow’s, Minneapolis MN

    Ingredients:

    For sauce
    3 cups orange juice
    1 carrot, chopped
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
    2 tablespoons grated peeled fresh ginger
    2 large garlic cloves, sliced
    1 jalapeño chili, seeded, minced
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    1 tablespoon Thai red curry base

    For pork
    1/2 cup molasses
    1/2 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce
    1/4 cup Thai red curry base
    1 tablespoon grated peeled fresh ginger
    1 1/2 pounds pork tenderloin, trimmed

     1 cup coconut milk

    1 tablespoon vegetable oil  

    Make sauce:
    Combine orange juice, carrot, cilantro, grated fresh ginger, garlic, minced jalapeño, ground cumin and Thai red curry base in heavy medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Boil mixture until carrot is very tender and liquid is reduced by half, stirring occasionally, about 12 minutes. Puree sauce in blender or processor in batches until smooth. Strain sauce and return to same saucepan. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

    Make pork:
    Stir molasses, soy sauce, curry base and ginger in large zip lock bag. Add pork tenderloin and turn to coat. Refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to 4 hours.

    Preheat grill to 350°F. Remove pork from marinade; discard marinade.  Heat grill and oil grates . Add pork and cook until slightly browned, cook until thermometer registers 160°F, about 20 minutes. Transfer pork to platter. Tent with foil to keep warm.

    Bring sauce to simmer. Remove from heat. Gradually 1 cup coconut milk, whisking just until blended. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

    Cut pork into 1-inch-thick slices. Serve with sauce.

    I have changed the recipe so that it could be prepared on the grill, and I substituted coconut milk for the bitter that goes in the sauce. If you wish to use butter instead of the milk use 6 tablespoons butter.

    venison_back_strap“Tender chunks of venison are marinated twice, and wrapped in thick bacon before being grilled until crispy on the outside. A venison version of Filet Mignon. This is a heavenly use of the best part of a deer. For the BBQ sauce, I prefer hickory flavored.”

    Recipe from www.allrecipes.com

    .INGREDIENTS
    2 pounds venison backstrap (tenderloin), cut into 2 inch chunks
    1 quart apple cider
    1 1/2 pounds thick sliced bacon
    2 (12 ounce) bottles barbecue sauce, your choice

    DIRECTIONS
    1.Place chunks of venison into a shallow baking dish, and pour enough apple cider in to cover them. Cover, and refrigerate for 2 hours. Remove, and pat dry. Discard apple cider, and return venison to the dish. Pour barbeque sauce over the chunks, cover, and refrigerate for 2 to 3 more hours.

    2.Preheat an outdoor grill for high heat. Charcoal is best, but if you must, use gas. Remove meat from the refrigerator, and let stand for 30 minutes, or until no longer chilled. Wrap each chunk of venison in a slice of bacon, and secure with toothpicks.

    3.Brush the grill grate with olive oil when hot, and place venison pieces on the grill so they are not touching. The bacon will kick up some flames, so be ready. Grill, turning occasionally, until the bacon becomes slightly burnt, 15 to 20 minutes. The slower, the better. Dig in, and prepare to want more!

    bratwurst-21With summer quickly approaching it is now the time to start thinking Bratwurst. Living in Wisconsin I don’t feel the need to put a recipe here, but you may want to check out this link for everything bratwurst.
    http://www.bratwurstpages.com/brats.html

    235358

    Bon Appétit |  July 2006

    Rick Browne

    yield: Makes 4 to 6 servings

    • 2 pounds sweet potatoes or yams, peeled, cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch-thick slices, each slice cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch-wide strips
    • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
    • 1 tablespoon (packed) golden brown sugar
    • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    • Additional olive oil

    Prepare barbecue (medium heat). Place potatoes in 13x9x2-inch baking dish. Add 1/4 cup oil, chopped fresh rosemary, brown sugar, garlic powder, and cayenne pepper to potatoes. Sprinkle potatoes with salt and pepper; toss to coat. Brush grill lightly with oil. Place potatoes on grill, spacing about 1 inch apart. Grill until potatoes are tender and slightly charred, turning occasionally, about 10 minutes total. Transfer potatoes to bowl, season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve.